All posts filed under: Bali

Seaweed farms Nusa Ceningan (8 of 33)

Seaweed farms

[vc_row type=”in_container” bg_position=”left top” bg_repeat=”no-repeat” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” top_padding=”5%” bottom_padding=”5%”][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text] I am almost there with my Balinese travelogue, I promise! Here is a quick review of what I’ve written to date, in case you’d like a quick recap: Introduction and our first night in Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, where we ate dinner in Chinatown and became friends with a taxi driver Ubud the Royal town of Bali, my own version of Eat, Pray Love. Seriously. Visiting Ulun Danu temple, the iconic water temple in Northern Bali and a quiet afternoon by the lake. Cock-fighting and waterfalls i.e. Balinese countryside in Munduk. How I spent a day with an old artist from Ubud i.e. batik class Praying for my life on a speed boat from Sanur to Nusa Ceningan and introduction to the island Idyllic mornings on Nusa Ceningan i.e. the boat ride was worth it. Island life   Seaweed farms and Ceningan people [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”full_width_background” bg_position=”center center” bg_repeat=”no-repeat” bg_color=”#000000″ scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” top_padding=”40%” bottom_padding=”40%” bg_image=”4725″][vc_column width=”1/1″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” bg_position=”left top” bg_repeat=”no-repeat” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” top_padding=”5%” …

review le pirate beach club nusa ceningan (12 of 31)

Mornings on Nusa Ceningan

  The cockerels wouldn’t shut up for the entire night. They started crowing shortly after the sea waves had helped us fall asleep. They were still crowing at 2 and 4 am and at 5.30 I’ve had enough. It was still slightly dark outside, I sneaked out from our beach hut and sat on the small terrace in front of it, facing the pool and the blue lagoon. Wooden boats rocked softly on the waves. The only audible sound was made by the waves, with a seldom interruption by a cockerel. I sat in silence through the sunrise and went to get my camera. Around 6.30 staff members started setting up for breakfast. Hens were wandering freely on the grounds between beach huts and sun loungers. I took some pictures, poured myself a cup of black coffee and read a book until J woke up. The night before I wasn’t sure if we should have had come to Nusa Ceningan, it was a bit of splurge to stay at Le Pirate Beach Club. Now I …

from bali to nusa ceningan boat ride (10 of 10)

From Bali to Nusa Ceningan.

Our time in Bali was coming to an end. For the last part of our trip we decided to go to one of the small islands next to Bali – Nusa Ceningan. Most people on the LP travel forum agreed that it was much less touristy and less crowded than its sister island Nusa Lembongan. The island is known for its seaweed plantations, slower pace of life and beautiful sunsets – pretty perfect for the last 5 days of our time in Indonesia. We drove to Sanur to catch the boat to Ceningan and didn’t expect that there would be no harbour or pier. We boarded the boat straight from the beach. I was expecting a choppy ride and to be honest it was pretty bad. J enjoyed it, but there were a few moments when I feared the boat was going to break into pieces. We would go up on the wave and immediately go 1 meter down, sending the water splashing in all directions.   The boat had three or more extra engines …

Bali Batik Class in Ubud the best batik class ubud bali bible bali bucketlist ubud activities (3 of 11)

Batik class in Ubud

Ok, I’ll admit it, I felt a little bit like I was in the “Eat Pray Love” movie. J decided to stay in the hotel by the pool for the day and we arranged to meet again for dinner. This meant I had about 8h just for myself. Don’t get me wrong, I love spending time with J when we travel, but I also like having time to myself. I decided to do the batik class on a whim. As I walked past the gate of the museum I realised that I was the only one taking the batik class that day. An old man in a sarong was laying out canvas, paper templates and bottles of paint on a roofed terrace outside one of the museum buildings. He asked me to sit down and my class started. He spoke very little English but we could understand each other just fine. He was an art teacher in a local art college, he told me. Next time I wanted to have an art class I should come to his …

Rural Bali see real Bali Munduk what to do in Munduk (13 of 25)

Balinese countryside: Munduk

Having arrived at night, I wasn’t able to appreciate the beauty of this place until the next morning. We were staying in a homestay – a type of a place where local families rent a couple of rooms out in their own compound. You would eat with them, and usually are welcome to participate in their daily activities such as making an offering in a family temple (every household has one, from modest to very ornate ones), working in the field and sitting down for an evening meal. Our homestay was more modern, we stayed in a bungalow in the garden, with an open roof bathroom and more bugs than we were used to having in a bedroom. Munduk is a small village located in the remote part of Northern Bali, near Bedugul region known for temples and waterfalls. The next day we arranged to go for a walk around the plantations and hills. Our guide, Ponk, was a local guy who worked on clove plantations. He was getting married soon he told us, and …

Bali Ulun Danu Temple real Bali northern Bali temples (9 of 26)

Ulun Danu Temple and Northern Bali

I could hear the frogs singing on the rice terraces, the air was warm but the humidity of the day subsided in our village called Mas. The wind was rustling the palm leaves behind the hedge. I took a map of Bali and started planning, feeling slightly overwhelmed. I haven’t travelled to the other side of the world to see things I could just as well visit in Europe after all. There were temples, waterfalls, beaches and volcanoes waiting to be explored. I wondered about how modern travel is different to journeys in the 19th and 20th century. I have already seen the temples I was going to visit online. Was there any point? Should I not have researched Bali before coming here? Was the fear of missing out stronger than my longing for adventure and exploration? Gusti had the biggest smile and a voice of somebody who smoked too many cigarettes. I bit my tongue and didn’t mention the deadly consequences of his habit. Before too long we were on our way, chatting with …

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Bali Part 1 // Ubud

Ubud, the royal town of Bali is also the island’s cultural centre, with temples, museums, rice paddies and five star hotels built next to simple yoga centres. I wouldn’t call it a town of contrasts though. The ambience is very relaxed, the poverty well hidden in the back alleys as to not to be an eyesore to the eco-friendly, yoga-pants wearing, earth-loving tourists. I’m being a little sarcastic because it seems as though the Eat Pray Love book, by many referred to as “that damn book”, resulted in an influx of a very defined demographic to Ubud and probably shaped its current expat-led cafe culture. Places such as “Sacred Scoops” (raw, local, vegan, organic, low-glycemic, gluten free ice cream) seem to grow like mushrooms on every corner, which makes me chuckle a little. Nonetheless it’s a very pleasant, culturally rich place; and for us it was a perfect starting point to explore Bali. For the first week or so we stayed in a small village around 15 minute drive from Ubud in a cosy hotel …

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Bali : Introduction and the first night in Kuala Lumpur

*oh Bali…* I’ve been thinking how to start sharing our Balinese trip and the first thing that comes to mind is just a dreamy sigh. *oh Bali…green, beautiful Bali* But let’s start from the very beginning. We boarded the Dreamliner to Kuala Lumpur, not later than about 10h after coming back from T in the Park (the biggest music festival in Scotland, one that people, now including us, are pride to have survived). We were exhausted and so happy to have the next 7h to just relax, sleep, read and watch movies. It was my first long haul flight ever and the novelty of it was indeed very exciting, but I tried to keep my cool and concealed it by sleeping (obvs.). We flew with Qatar airways over a couple of war zones, oblivious to the fact that two days later hundreds of people would tragically die on the same route, many of them indeed having boarded the Malaysian aircraft with the same prospect as us:  of a glorious holiday in Bali (such a chilling thought, that I still have …